Samsung says it owes Apple only $52mn, not $380 mn for patent violations

Apple demands $380mn from Samsung for violating patents, Samsung defies their claim saying they owe them only $52mn. A new trial sc.

Samsung says it owes Apple only $52mn, not $380 mn for patent violations

Samsung says it owes Apple only $52mn, not $380 mn for patent violations

Samsung and Apple have locked horns again, as Samsung has said that it owes Apple $52 million instead of the $380 million that Apple claims.

As you might be aware, an American judge declared that Samsung electronics had violated certain patent protocols and copied vital features of the iPhone and iPad, such as scrolling and the ‘bounce back’ function at the end of documents.

The companies made their demands on Wednesday during opening statements of a patent trial in San Jose, California. The issue at hand here is a set of 13 older products which a previous jury found infringed upon several Apple patents. The previous jury, awarded Apple $1.05 billion after determining 26 Samsung products had violated six Apple patents.

However, a judge made the startling revelation that the previous jury miscalculated $400 million in damages for 13 products and has ordered a new trial to come to the correct figure.

“Apple lost sales because Samsung was selling infringing products,” Apple attorney Harold McIhenny told the jury. He argued that Apple’s lost profits, Samsung’s profits on the offending devices and royalties owed Apple, add up to $380 million. “In a fair fight, in a fair competition, the money they got would have and should have gone to Apple “,  said McIlhenny.

In response, Samsung’s attorney Bill Price added that consumers prefered Samsung’s devices, which operate with Google’s Android OS, because of the many differences rather than the similarities they have with Apple. Price told jury that Samsung owes Apple $52 million.

“Apple is simply asking for much more money than it’s entitled to”, said Price.

Price accepted that Samsung was guilty of copying Apple’s features, but downplayed the aspect of technology in devices. “This is a case not where we’re disputing that the 13 phones contain some elements of Apple’s property,” Price said. “That doesn’t mean Apple gets to come in here and ask for a windfall … for more than it is entitled.”

The current trial is a dispute over older products, which are not even on sale in the U.S. Another trial is scheduled again in March over Samsung’s devices currently in the U.S.

Apple has argued with courts around the world that Samsung’s Android based phones have copied Apple’s technology, while Samsung is fighting back with its own reasons that some key Apple patents are invalid and Apple has infringed upon Samsung’s technology.

Both have won and lost legal battles over the past couple of years. and analysts predict this feud to carry on for months to come.

The current trial could be a warm-up for bigger things to come in March. Apple is asking Samsung to be boycotted from selling some of its current devices in the U.S.

Source: FirstPost heduled is in March.

 

Apple sends out updates to fix issues with latest Retina MacBooks

Separate updates sent out for the 13-inch Retina and the 15-inch Retina MacBooks, fixing the trackpad freeze issues, as well as graphics related niggles.

Apple sends out updates to fix issues with latest Retina MacBooks

Apple sends out updates to fix issues with latest Retina MacBooks

After admitting to the issue a few days back, Apple has issued updates that would fix the trackpad and keyboard freeze issues plaguing the latest generation MacBook Pro Retina machines. Announced just last month, the new MacBooks are the first in their line-up to be powered by the Intel Haswell processors.

The EFI Update v1.3 is specific to the 13-inch Retina MacBooks, marked as late 2013 models. This update “addresses an issue where the built-in keyboard and Multi-Touch trackpad may become unresponsive.” The update size is 4.6MB, and can be downloaded from here.

The EFI Update v1.2 is specific to the 15-inch MacBook Pro Retina versions with the NVIDIA graphics. Apple says that “This update addresses an issue which, in rare cases, may limit the performance of the discrete graphics processor after a system wake or boot.” This update is a little more than 5MB, and can be downloaded from here.

Someone in Cupertino has taken the criticism from the customers fairly seriously, because an update for Mail in Mavericks has also been issues, which attempts to iron out the issues the email client was having with Gmail accounts. Additionally, the iBooks app on Mavericks has also been updated, but the release details don’t divulge much, apart from the oft heard “bug fixes and improvements to performance and stability.”

Hopefully, these updates will solve issues like keyboard and trackpad freeze on the newer MacBooks, while the 15-inch version reportedly had issues with the NVIDIA graphics not kicking in, in certain conditions.

Hopefully, the two EFI updates will solve the issues that have been bothering the users of the latest generation MacBook Pro Retina 13 and 15-inch versions.

Source: http://www.thinkdigit.com/Laptops-PCs/Apple-sends-out-updates-to-fix-issues_18343.html

 

iPhone 5s 16GB priced at Rs. 53,500, iPhone 5c at Rs. 41,900 in India

The India pricing for Apple’s latest iPhones has been revealed. The devices will hit store shelves on October 25, just in time for the holiday shopping.

iPhone 5s 16GB priced at Rs. 53,500, iPhone 5c at Rs. 41,900 in India

iPhone 5s 16GB priced at Rs. 53,500, iPhone 5c at Rs. 41,900 in India

Apple’s flagship smartphones, the iPhone 5s and the iPhone 5c will launch in India on October 25. The iPhone 5s is priced at Rs. 53,500 for the 16GB model, Rs. 62,500 for the 32GB model and Rs 71,500 for the 64GB model. The iPhone 5c is priced at Rs. 41,900 for the 16GB model and Rs. 53,500 for the 32GB model. The two smartphones will be available contract free in India but will also be sold by Airtel and R Com. Both the service providers claim that they will offer attractive data and talk plans with the two devices.

Apple had earlier revealed that the iPhones would launch in India along with other countries on November 1. The smartphones are launching five days earlier than announced.

The iPhone 5s is the flagship of the two devices. The hardware powering the smartphone has been upgraded when compared to the previous generation along with the camera, flash and a new finger print scanner. The smartphone is available in three colours – white, black and gold.

The iPhone 5s brings with it a slew of features, some, which we appreciate, and some, which we don’t.

The iPhone 5c on the other hand is available in a number of colours and “c” in the name doesn’t stand for cheap but Colour. The device has the same internal specifications as the iPhone 5, which has been discontinued by Apple. The 5c is a heavier and thicker smartphone than the iPhone 5 and 5s.

The iPhone has seen a number of changes since it was first launched back in 2007. You can take a look atthe evolution of the iPhone to see how much the smartphone has changed from its first iteration over the years.

Apple quietly updates the iMac with Haswell processors

The updated iMac range starts at Rs 99,900 for the 21.5-inch version, while the 27-inch version starts at Rs 139,900.

Apple quietly updates the iMac with Haswell processors

Apple quietly updates the iMac with Haswell processors

In a rather quiet update announcement, Apple has made it official that the iMac desktop range has now received the Intel Haswell refresh. The upgrade has been done to both the 21.5-inch version and the 27-inch version. Like the 2013 MacBook Air, the iMac also supports Wireless 802.11ac standard. The entry level version will now feature 8GB of RAM and a 1TB hard drive, and customers can upgrade that to 32GB RAM and up to 3TB hard drive.

“iMac continues to be the example that proves how beautiful, fast and fun a desktop computer can be,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing. “Inside its ultra-thin aluminium enclosure, the new iMac has the latest Intel processors, faster graphics, next generation 802.11ac Wi-Fi and faster PCIe flash storage.”

Apple has shared the India pricing of the new iMac desktops.

The entry level 21.5-inch iMac (2.7 GHz quad-core Intel Core i5 up to 3.2 GHz and Intel Iris Pro) is priced at INR 99,900 while the the slightly more powerful 21.5-inch iMac (2.9 GHz quad-core Intel Core i5 up to 3.6 GHz and NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M ) will retail at Rs 114,900.

 

 

The 27-inch iMac is available with a 3.2 GHz quad-core Intel Core i5 with Turbo Boost speeds up to 3.6 GHz and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 755M for a suggested retail price of INR 139,900, while the 3.4 GHz quad-core Intel Core i5 with Turbo Boost speeds up to 3.8 GHz and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 775M for a suggested retail price of INR 154,900.

 

Benchmark performance: iOS 6 vs iOS 7 on the iPhone 5

With iOS 7 now available for iPhone users, we have been getting queries asking if there has been any performance impact, negative or positive, after the upgrade to the latest OS. We attempt to answer those questions with the help of benchmarks.

Benchmark performance: iOS 6 vs iOS 7 on the iPhone 5

Benchmark performance: iOS 6 vs iOS 7 on the iPhone 5

Apple has made iOS 7 officially available now for the iPhones, the iPad and the latest generation iPod Touch. There are the fans, and there are those criticizing it, but one thing cannot be disputed – this is the biggest iOS upgrade in years. The changes are significant, with the most visible one being the new UI. Hence, the inevitable question – how is the performance of the new OS?

Users have been asking us this query for quite some time now, but we refrained from pronouncing any judgement on iOS 7’s performance while it was in the various pre-launch stages. However, now that the final version is out, we have run a series of benchmark tests on the iPhone 5 running the iOS 6.1.4 version, before upgrading OTA to iOS 7 and running the same benchmarks again, after checking for any updates for them, individually.

To ensure that no benchmark run had any advantage or disadvantage, all the tests across both OSes were run on the same device, with the exact same settings. We even ensured that something like Bluetooth was switched off at all times. The applications installed remained consistent across all benchmark runs, on both iOS versions. We manually closed all apps that were running in the background, so that the app load didn’t have a bearing on the performance and the resources. For the browser benchmark tests, we hooked up the phone to the same Wi-Fi network, with no other device connected to the hotspot at that time.

  

To break it down even further, we have subdivided the tests into categories – system performance, graphics performance and web browser performance.

System Performance: Better memory handling makes the difference
The Passmark Mobile Performance Test registers a lower system score in iOS 7, but critically, better read and write scores for both the internal storage as well as the memory. This is critical, because for most tasks that don’t need raw processor power, the read and write speeds make all the difference between smooth performance and a sluggish setup. The CPU score also goes up with iOS 7, showing that the new OS is ever so slightly better optimized. We mention that the overall system score goes down, but that could be a factor of the graphics tests that the benchmark runs, which we will not pay much attention to since we have dedicated graphics benchmark tests coming up.

Passmark Performance Test Mobile
iOS 6.1.4 iOS 7 % Difference
System Score 3932 3603 -8
CPU Score 24922 25418 2
Disk Score 13154 13480 2
Read (in Mbyte/s) 44.9 44 -2
Write (in Mbyte/s) 157 164 4
Memory Score 2998 3295 10
Read (in Mbyte/s) 517 566 9
Write (in Mbyte/s) 509 569 12
2D Score 1641 1250 24
3D Score 1756 1762 -0.34

The second system test, GeekBench, also verifies what PassMark says about the better processor performance, with the multi-core utilization tests showing up a higher score than on iOS 6.

GeekBench
iOS 6.1.4 iOS 7 % Difference
Single Core Score 722 722 0.00
Multi-Core Score 1298 1302 -0.31

Graphics Performance: Improves slightly 
While not everyone likes to game on their iPhone, there are those who do. And they were served rather well by the very smooth performance and experience that iOS 6 offered with this particular hardware. After the iOS 7 upgrade, the 3D Mark Ice Storm and the 3D Mark Ice Storm Ultimate benchmark tests register slightly better scores, while the Ice Storm Extreme score remains the same. Simply put, the excellent exiting performance via iOS 6 improves even further with the new operating system.

3D Mark
iOS 6.1.4 iOS 7 % Difference
Ice Storm 5418 6011 11
Ice Storm Extreme 3351 3351 0.00
Ice Storm Ultimate 5516 5711 4

GFX Benchmark did give a slightly different analysis, with one test registering pretty much the same frames and fps scores, while the the second test saw a drop in both frames and fps.

GFX Bench
iOS 6.1.4 iOS 7 % Difference
Egypt HD (Offscreen) – Frames 3357 3358 0.3
Egypt HD (Offscreen) – fps 30 30 0.00
Egypt HD (Onscreen) – Frames 4572 4185 -8
Egypt HD (Onscreen) – fps 40 37 -8

Browser Test: Safari sees an improvement, mostly visual elements
The SunSpider 1.01 browser benchmark shows slightly better performance, in terms of Java performance. And for a web browser, even negligible differences can sometimes make lot of difference, and in this case, it seems to be working.

Sunspider 1.01 
Safari on iOS 6.1.4 Safari on iOS 7
Score (lower is better) 729.1ms 707.7ms

From the scores, it is clear that the performance difference between iOS 6 and iOS 7, at least on the iPhone 5 hardware, is not much. Critically, it shows a very slight improvement in areas like memory and storage access speeds, which make for an improvement in the overall speed and experience. All in all, you can safely upgrade your iPhone to the latest OS, with no fear of a performance drop, at least on the iPhone 5.

Have you updated you iPhone or iPad or the latest iPod Touch with iOS 7? We would like to hear your experience.

Source: http://www.thinkdigit.com/Mobiles-PDAs/Benchmark-performance-iOS-6-vs-iOS-7_17646.html

 

Woah! iOS 7 adoption just beat iOS 6, report shows

Woah! iOS 7 adoption just beat iOS 6, report shows

Woah! iOS 7 adoption just beat iOS 6, report shows

Apple’s new mobile operating system launched this week to highly mixed reviews. VentureBeat’s John Koetsier found much to dislike about iOS 7, but adoption rates are skyrocketing.

An analytics startup called Mixpanel has been tracking iOS 7 adoption and usage, in comparison to iOS 6. Apple fans have remained loyal to iOS6, but an increasing number are giving the newer operating system a shot.

Mixpanel’s chief executive Suhail Doshi just alerted us to the fact that iOS 7 just eclipsed iOS 6 for the first time.

Check out the full trend report here. 

iOS 7 beat iOS 6 at around 3.30pm PT.

Mixpanel

iOS 7 beat iOS 6 at around 3.30pm PT.

Mixpanel is tracking global mobile usage — Doshi said the data is based on 2.8 billion actions of people using thousands of mobile applications.

It’s also worth noting that there are discrepancies in different markets. In China, for instance, the new operating system has struggled to take off. But adoption has been far quicker in the United States.

The new operating system appears to have inspired a bit of a love/hate response from consumers and the press. It’s the largest visual overhaul since Apple first introduced the iPhone in 2007. The updates include a personable male voice from Siri, icon tweaking and polishing, and a new built-in flashlight.

“It looks like Apple proved its design won over its customers,” he said. “That’s surprising given how drastic it was.”

Have you switched over to the new operating system? Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below.

 

iPhone 5S User Guide has ‘Touch ID Sensor’

Apple is expected to unveil the iPhone 5S and a cheaper iPhone 5C model at a press event on September 10, 2013. This new smartphone may look like just another iPhone but it’s more than that.

iphone 5s gold

iphone 5s gold

The new iPhone appears to have a combination “Home button/Touch ID sensor”. Leaked images of new iPhone indicate the location of the “Lightning connector”, “Silver ring around home button”, “Volume buttons”, and “Sleep/Wake button.” image

The new smartphone is also expected to have an improved display for “increased brightness and/or reduced power consumption. It’s been reported that smartphone would have a Retina + Sharp IGZO display.

According to the leaked specs, the smartphone will include a faster processor iOS 7, an NFC reader, a Fingerprint Reader, a 4-inch 1136 × 640 display and a new 12 megapixel backside camera with dual LED flash. The new handset will also include 2GB of RAM, a quad-core SGX 554MP4 GPU, an A6 CPU and improved LTE. It also has a bigger battery than its predecessor.

It’s well known that one of the key battlegrounds of smartphone warfare is the specifications of the on-board camera. And as per reports, Apple will launch the 5S with a 13MP camera to give tough competition to other smartphone’s like Sony Xperia Z and Galaxy S4.

Leaked images have been surfacing all over the internet and show that iPhone would be offered in several color choices. There are many speculations about the smartphone hardware as iPhone 5C would be introduced as a less expensive alternative. As per reports, the shell or casing of this smartphone will be plastic, to save money.

Other leaked images have focused on the new (and still rumoured) champagne gold iPhone 5s option. Some of the latest images show the champagne gold option with the rumoured dual-flash.

The new iPhone is expected to land in stores around 20th September.

Samsung Galaxy Gear Smart Watch price, release date and specs

The Samsung ‘Galaxy Gear’ Smartwatch may have already been beaten by Sony’s Smartwatch 2 but it is hoping to take the wind out of Apple’s sails come September

Samsung Galaxy Gear Watch

Samsung Galaxy Gear Watch

The Samsung ‘Galaxy Gear’ Smart watch has been long rumoured ever since the launch of Sony’s SmartWatch 2 with the release date, pricing and the specs all pondered over.

Whilst news relating to Samsung’s Android-powered smart watch remains slim what we do know is that the company will be looking to make an impact this year following the launch of the Samsung Galaxy S4.

Apple are also set to unveil a new iPhone this September so Samsung will no doubt be looking to steal some of the thunder and what better way than with a smart watch.

With smartwear now becoming ever more popular thanks to fitness trackers like the Fitbit Flex and Nike Fuelband smartphone companies have also realised the potential of wrist-worn technology with Sony being one of the first major smartphone manufacturers to start producing a smart watch which will act as a portal to your device.

It comes as no coincidence that as smartphones get bigger we become more and more reliant on using other technology to gain quick access to out emails, texts and calls.

With ‘phablets’ like the  Sony Xperia Z Ultra and the rumoured Samsung Galaxy Note 3 proving that customers are just as interested in screen real estate as they are portability companies have started to look at new ways of interacting with our smartphones without ever having to take them out of our pockets.

Read our Best Smartwatches feature to see the best smart watches of the last 30 years and discover why we’ve become obsessed with controlling the world through wearable tech.

It’ll probably be called the Samsung Galaxy Gear

Unless Samsung is creating one of the biggest  tech diversions in history we’re pretty sure that it’ll be calling its smart watch the Samsung Galaxy Gear after it was reported that the company had filed for the trademark ‘Galaxy Gear’ in both Europe and the US.

With Sony already coining the phrase ‘SmartWatch’ Samsung will no doubt been looking at a way of placing their own unique stamp on the smartwatch market.

Galaxy Gear will come in five different colours

SamMobile are up to their usual tricks and have managed to get insider information on the launch of the Galaxy Gear which confirms that Samsung’s Smart Watch will launch in five different colours.

Initially available in White, Grey, Orange and Black the companion to Samsung’s range of Galaxy tablets and smartphones will then be available in a special White and Gold a week later. It’s not clear if this will be limited to certain regions or if it’ll be a global special edition.

Samsung Galaxy Gear will have a price around £200

This is nowhere near confirmed but by looking at the current market you’re able to guage how much any technology company will price their products in relation to the competition.

For example the Sony SmartWatch 2 costs £159.00 on Expansys whilst the Nike Fuelband costs around £129. If Samsung is looking to release a product that is as flagship as the Samsung Galaxy S4 or the Note 3 then it’ll need to be not only premium in the specs department but also an investment financially.

Taking into account the current rumours which point at some pretty high specs along with a considerable amount of connectivity including Bluetooth 4.0 and NFC it would be reasonable to assume that Samsung will price it slightly above Sony’s own effort which is, at present, the only main competition.

Samsung will announce the Galaxy Gear release date at Samsung Unpacked

SamMobile believe they have confirmed reports that Samsung will not only unveil the Galaxy Gear (SM-V700) but also the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 ahead of theIFA 2013 tech conference in Berlin.

It’s believed the Galaxy Gear will act as a companion device for other Galaxy devices like the Galaxy S4, Note 2 and Note 3 and possibly even Samsung’s Galaxy tablet range including the Galaxy Tab 8.0.

The Samsung Galaxy Gear will run Android

Galaxy Gear specs have been pretty thin on the ground but what we can say with relative certainty is that it will be running a heavily skinned version of Android.

Samsung’s smart watch could also feature a flexible screen after Samsung’s patent filings revealed their plans for a device which would feature a flexible display that would wrap around the users wrist.

The images show a device with a long screen which would bend around the wrist along with two standard Android soft keys at the bottom as found on Samsung’s smartphones.

One of the more interesting specs that has been leaked via the patent is the news that the Galaxy Gear will be able to access the internet, send messages and make calls without pairing it to your smartphone suggesting that the device will actually support mobile networks via what would almost certainly have to be a Nano SIM.

5 things we’ve learned about the future of wearables from Samsung’s Galaxy Gear

VentureBeat got an exclusive early look at Samsung’s upcoming smartwatch, the Galaxy Gear, over the weekend.

5 things we’ve learned about the future of wearables from Samsung’s Galaxy Gear

5 things we’ve learned about the future of wearables from Samsung’s Galaxy Gear

It’s a chunky, ugly block of a thing, even accounting for the fact that the model we saw (and got photos of) is just a prototype, as VentureBeat reporter Christina Farr reported.

But even in its unfinished state, Samsung’s Galaxy Gear tells us a lot about where the emerging smartwatch industry is going. Here are five conclusions we can already draw about smartwatches and wearable tech.

Smartwatches are big devices

According to our source as well as other publications, the prototype is not far from what the real thing will look like. It probably won’t have exposed screws on the front: That’s an unfinished-looking detail that might make sense on a Casio G-Shock watch, but this doesn’t fit in with Samsung’s overall approach to gadget design. It may have different colors and a different skin; it may even have a slightly different shape.

But the basics will likely be just as we reported: a 3-inch-diagonal slab on top of your wrist, with a 2.5-inch OLED screen embedded in it. It will have a camera (4 megapixels), accelerometers, Android apps, and both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth for connecting to the Internet and to your phone.

And thanks to recent court decisions, the face of the watch will probably be a rounded rectangle.

Reports on battery life differ: Our source told us it would last about 10 hours, but others are saying 24 hours of normal use and just 10 hours when under heavy use. We’ll have to wait until we have our hands on a production model and can fully test it to know for sure.

It’s not clear who wants to wear a giant, 3-inch chunk of metal and plastic on their wrist. People with skinny wrists, not so much.

That’s why many people have their hopes pinned on Apple’s upcoming news conference on Sept. 10, where they hope to see the Cupertino iPhone maker unveil its own smartwatch. Presumably Apple, even in the faded-glory Tim Cook days, would never embarrass itself by shipping something so huge and blocky as Samsung’s Galaxy Gear.

But even Apple will be limited by physics to a certain extent. As it discovered with its now-defunct square iPod Nano, the smallest you can conceivably make a touchscreen is about two inches square — and even that is a little too small to be usable. But a two-inch-square screen is still going to make for a rather bulky watch, by wristwatch standards.

Wearable tech is fitness-focused

One thing is clear: Samsung is making fitness and health tracking a big part of its push into wearable technology.

It’s a smart choice, since fitness is the route through which wearables have entered the market most successfully so far. To the extent that people are “wearing” technology, it’s been through fitness-tracking bracelets like Nike’s Fuelband, not geek-chic eyewear like Google Glass.

Nike’s Fuelbands are everywhere. Competitors, including the Fitbit Flex and the Jawbone Up, have sprouted up. The Basis watch is closer to a modern smartwatch in that it has a full-blown display.

But while they have their fans, more generic “smartwatches” like the Pebble haven’t taken off to the same extent. The Pebble enhances your experience of using a phone, but it’s not a fitness device.

Samsung’s focus on fitness stands in contrast to Sony, which has its own Android SmartWatch product (which almost no one is using, as far as I know — I’ve never seen one in the wild). Sony’s product does offer fitness apps, but it’s primarily a notification device that enhances your phone by giving you a miniature display that can alert you to incoming calls and texts, help you place calls, etc.

It turns out that people are more willing to put something on their wrist if it helps them achieve fitness goals than if it simply helps them use their smartphones.

Wearable tech is on the wrist

There’s another approach to getting people to wear technology: Embed it into something like your eyeglasses, giving you an omnipresent heads-up display.

But while Google Glass has provoked a lot of excited experimentation and speculation, it has also provoked an equally excited backlash. And “smart glasses” are far less ubiquitous than fitness bands.

The reason for that is clear: Putting something on your wrist is a smaller commitment than putting something on your head.

At a conference earlier this year, Cook made some guardedly positive comments about Google Glass.

But he said, “From a mainstream point of view, this [pointing at his head] is difficult.”

Some day, we may all be wearing heads-up displays that enable us to discreetly Google people as we meet them. But for now, the technology is simply too intrusive-looking and too odd to pass muster with the mainstream — no matter how many Vogue fashion features Google Glass appears in.

In the near term, the wrist is where it’s at for wearables.

Thanks to Samsung and the anticipated entrance of Apple into the smartwatch market, Juniper Research recently estimated that smartwatch sales would jump from 1 million units this year to 36 million in 2018. That’s a typical wild-eyed analyst guess, but it does give some sense of the potential for growth in this market.

Wearables will reshape the health industry

Wrist-mounted computers or smartwatches will eventually prove to be an enormous boon for the health industry, because of their potential to help individuals collect data on their physical activity, motivate them to exercise more, and provide health care companies with real, personal data.

Today, smartwatches and fitness bands can track physical activity through the most basic metrics, such as steps. With more sophisticated accelerometers and algorithms, the Fuelband can make a guess at what kind of activity you’re actually doing. Some devices, like the Basis watch, track heart rate.

Future sensors could enable smartwatches to track things like your blood oxygenation level, muscle activation, posture, and more. In some cases, these may require additional sensors located on other parts of your body: an oxygenation sensor on the tip of your toe, a posture sensor taped to your back, and so forth.

“I envision the iWatch as a sensor network,” Tan Rao, the founder of a wearables startup called Sensing Strip, told VentureBeat recently while speculating about a future Apple smartwatch. “The master sensor will likely be located on the wrist.”

Privacy, of course, becomes a huge issue when devices are gathering such intimate data on what your body is doing. The data becomes valuable for diagnosis, prevention, and fitness when you can share it with your doctor and your personal trainer — but you want to make sure it doesn’t get used to deny you a job, turn you down for medical coverage, or get posted to public networks without your permission.

“No one has created standards around that; no one is digging deep on the privacy side,” said Missy Krasner, an executive in residence at Morgenthaler Ventures, in the same VentureBeat article.

Wearables will need data standards

Finally, with so many competitors in the wearables sector, we need ways to connect them to one another. It’s an issue we already face with the proliferation of fitness apps: I can use RunKeeper on my iPhone, Android phone, or via a web page, but I can’t get RunKeeper’s data to sync with MapMyFitness.

Similarly, if I’m using a Nike Fuelband, I can’t get its obnoxiously proprietary “Fuel” points to translate into data that is usable by other fitness-tracking apps.

After Samsung releases a smartwatch, there will be one more player on the market providing a device that generates data. Is it too much to hope that this data will be easy to integrate into other fitness applications?

The fact that Samsung’s Galaxy Gear is Android-based suggests that interoperability might, in fact, be on its way.

But don’t hold your breath for Apple’s iWatch, if it appears next week, to interoperate with data from the Galaxy Gear — or vice versa.

What this industry needs, if it’s going to grow beyond a few niche products for enthusiasts, is some way to collect all this data, integrate it, and share it — securely, while respecting the privacy preferences of each individual — and feed it into larger health care and fitness-management programs.

SOURCE: http://venturebeat.com/2013/09/03/future-wearables-samsung/

iOS 7 release date confirmed by company behind Siri

Nuance, the company behind Siri, confirms iOS 7 release date in an email sent out to developers.

iOS 7 release date confirmed by company behind Siri

iOS 7 release date confirmed by company behind Siri

After a couple of months of heated conversations and adrenaline fueled debates on its looks and design, the seventh version of iOS, Apple’s venerable mobile operating system, will, in all probability, be made available for general consumption on September 10. The date was leaked online through an email sent by Nuance, the company responsible for Siri, the voice assistant on iPhones and iPads, to Owen Williams, a developer. In the email, Nuance informs developers, “As you are probably aware, iOS 7 GA (which stands for General Availability) will be released on September 10th.” The email which was live on Nuance’s servers has now been taken down but it’s highly unlikely that it contained incorrect information considering the fact that Nuance works very closely with Apple.

iOS 7 will mark the biggest change for the mobile operating systemin terms of looks and design. Under the direction of Jony Ive, the Senior Vice President of Design at Apple, iOS will forsake skeuomorphism (design that emulates real-world objects, for e.g. textures that resemble wood or metal) and go for a flatter, cleaner design. The response from the public and the media since the new design was unveiled at WWDC 2013 has been polarizing, to put it mildly. We’ve seen quite a bit of criticism towards iOS 7 with many calling it too colourful and visually inconsistent while others have praised Apple for taking a risk in changing up the look of an OS that had started to look staid.

When all is said and done, it doesn’t really matter what the media or commenters say until the final product is out there and in the hands of consumers. That’s why, September 10 can’t come soon enough.

Source: Owen Williams’ Blog via The Verge